Turnbull's Tasmanian Power Play

Sparks fly over NBN as Visionstream urged to ‘come out of hiding’

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THE company overseeing the rollout of the NBN in Tasmania has been told to “come clean” on the status of the $300 million project.

Tasmania’s communications sector has urged Visionstream to “come out of hiding” amid concerns the NBN rollout has stalled.

The calls come as federal Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday accused Visionstream of stopping work on Tasmania’s NBN rollout.

NBN Co has also confirmed the pace of the rollout has slowed.

Visionstream has consistently refused to comment on concerns being raised about the NBN rollout in Tasmania.

Yesterday the company did not reply to calls from the Mercury.

TasICT executive officer Dean Winter said yesterday “trying to get information out of Visionstream is like trying to draw blood from a stone”.

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“There will be endless speculation about the status of the NBN rollout in Tasmania until Visionstream finally comes clean on what is going on.”

Mr Winter said there needed to be a detailed public statement made about the company’s progress and its ability to complete the $300 million contract it signed last year.

“We’ve got an interstate company who have won the right to deliver the most important infrastructure project of this generation, but who seem totally disengaged with the Tasmanian community.”

An NBN Co spokesman told the Mercury yesterday NBN Co was in discussions with Visionstream about rates and costs.

“As a result, the pace of the rollout in Tasmania has slowed,” the spokesman said.

“We’re working to resolve this issue.

“This is in addition to the impact that the halt to remediation work on pits and pipes due to asbestos has had on the rollout. Visionstream is contracted by Telstra to carry out this work.”

The spokesman said 32,000 homes and businesses in Tasmania now had access to the fibre. Visionstream had been contracted to deliver to 190,000 premises.

Mr Turnbull told ABC radio yesterday work had stopped on the NBN in Tasmania.

Nine out of 10 Tasmanians did not have access to the NBN, Mr Turnbull said.

“The bottom line is that there was not one thing I could do to stop the NBN rollout in Tasmania — because it has been stopped,” Mr Turnbull said.

“At this stage Visionstream is not building anything. There is a serious problem there that we have to address.”

Yesterday Mr Turnbull stood by the pre-election vow that all existing contracts would be honoured, but raised concerns about Visionstream’s work.

“Visionstream, it was reported, signed a contract in March 2012 worth $300 million to complete the entire fibre rollout in Tasmania covering about 200,000 premises. That’s what NBN Co announced and that was to be completed by 2015.

“As far as we can see no work has been done by Visionstream for at least two months — they have basically downed tools.

“I am not saying we would dishonour or breach any contract, but at the moment nothing is being done under the contract by the contractor.”

Sourced from The Mercury

Now let’s see how this new Liberal Government will sit back and ensure that Tasmanians will be denied the opportunity to get connected to the NBN via FTTH. Ok so I’m one of the lucky ones who has been able to get connected, but it looks like there’s a stalemate that the general public won’t be privy to the finer details. I just hope this contract is honoured (as Mr Turnbull claims)

Only time will tell… 😐

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Turnbull’s Tasmanian Power Play

Sparks fly over NBN as Visionstream urged to ‘come out of hiding’

image

THE company overseeing the rollout of the NBN in Tasmania has been told to “come clean” on the status of the $300 million project.

Tasmania’s communications sector has urged Visionstream to “come out of hiding” amid concerns the NBN rollout has stalled.

The calls come as federal Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull yesterday accused Visionstream of stopping work on Tasmania’s NBN rollout.

NBN Co has also confirmed the pace of the rollout has slowed.

Visionstream has consistently refused to comment on concerns being raised about the NBN rollout in Tasmania.

Yesterday the company did not reply to calls from the Mercury.

TasICT executive officer Dean Winter said yesterday “trying to get information out of Visionstream is like trying to draw blood from a stone”.

Start of sidebar. Skip to end of sidebar.

End of sidebar. Return to start of sidebar.

“There will be endless speculation about the status of the NBN rollout in Tasmania until Visionstream finally comes clean on what is going on.”

Mr Winter said there needed to be a detailed public statement made about the company’s progress and its ability to complete the $300 million contract it signed last year.

“We’ve got an interstate company who have won the right to deliver the most important infrastructure project of this generation, but who seem totally disengaged with the Tasmanian community.”

An NBN Co spokesman told the Mercury yesterday NBN Co was in discussions with Visionstream about rates and costs.

“As a result, the pace of the rollout in Tasmania has slowed,” the spokesman said.

“We’re working to resolve this issue.

“This is in addition to the impact that the halt to remediation work on pits and pipes due to asbestos has had on the rollout. Visionstream is contracted by Telstra to carry out this work.”

The spokesman said 32,000 homes and businesses in Tasmania now had access to the fibre. Visionstream had been contracted to deliver to 190,000 premises.

Mr Turnbull told ABC radio yesterday work had stopped on the NBN in Tasmania.

Nine out of 10 Tasmanians did not have access to the NBN, Mr Turnbull said.

“The bottom line is that there was not one thing I could do to stop the NBN rollout in Tasmania — because it has been stopped,” Mr Turnbull said.

“At this stage Visionstream is not building anything. There is a serious problem there that we have to address.”

Yesterday Mr Turnbull stood by the pre-election vow that all existing contracts would be honoured, but raised concerns about Visionstream’s work.

“Visionstream, it was reported, signed a contract in March 2012 worth $300 million to complete the entire fibre rollout in Tasmania covering about 200,000 premises. That’s what NBN Co announced and that was to be completed by 2015.

“As far as we can see no work has been done by Visionstream for at least two months — they have basically downed tools.

“I am not saying we would dishonour or breach any contract, but at the moment nothing is being done under the contract by the contractor.”

Sourced from The Mercury

Now let’s see how this new Liberal Government will sit back and ensure that Tasmanians will be denied the opportunity to get connected to the NBN via FTTH. Ok so I’m one of the lucky ones who has been able to get connected, but it looks like there’s a stalemate that the general public won’t be privy to the finer details. I just hope this contract is honoured (as Mr Turnbull claims)

Only time will tell… 😐

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Opposition Explain FTTN Policy

The debate over the future roll out of the NBNCo infrastructure is taking an interesting spin. The current policy is to install FTTH (Fibre to the Home) however the opposition wish to change this to FTTN (Fibre to the Node)
So how does this change things? Well FTTH brings the end user fibre optic cable to the house (point of entry) however FTTN has the fibre optic cable terminate into a node where the end user will still rely on copper wire connection.

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Phone Line Shenanigans

All the trouble started around 10:45 on the 18th when a contractor working for the NBNCo managed to dig trough the phone cable about 200m down the road. So the obvious was immediate loss of DSL connection which also left me without a telephone. A quick call to my ISP (Internode) revealed that they had lost the signal to the line I’m on at about 200m short of my house! So I went for a stroll down the road to see if there was any obvious signs as to what had happened. When I rounded the corner there was an excavator on the back of a truck leaving the scene and a guy standing in the trench that had just been opened not looking too pleased. Here’s a picture of the damaged phone cable…

cable_severed

Later in the day the site looked like this…

later_that_day

Then the following day all was fixed and covered up…

aftermath

So did I have a connection once the cable was rejoined? I did for about half an hour then all was lost 🙁 So I rang my ISP to see if they were aware of the cable being fixed and to try and get them to do another line test but the guy who took my call clearly wasn’t Mr Helpful as he just kept telling me that my service won’t be looked at until the 28th (February) At this point I was getting rather frustrated with him and when I asked what my options are for getting either an alternate access or a credit for downtime he stated that I didn’t qualify for either and reminded me about the 28th (I was going in circles) so the conversation ended.

Skip forward to the 28th… I was of the opinion that this was to be the day that I’d get my phone/internet restored. Well no it wasn’t! I contacted my ISP around 1:30pm to get an update on how things were going to get a rather rude shock to be told that there wasn’t a job in the system for the checking/repair of my line. Now this is when I did my best not to become abusive! But I certainly got the point across of dissatisfaction because of being disconnected for a week and a half and the guy on the support line was doing all he could to see why the appointment was either cancelled or never booked (my speculation) then checked to see if they had any loan equipment (3G modem) available but due to the recent bush fires in the south (Forcett, Dunalley & Tasman Peninsula) all there gear was out on loan. So this is where the job was booked in for the 7th of March!

Well after sending an email to a friend to advise that my APRS iGate & T2 server will be still out of action until then (7th March) I get a phone call from his son (just happens to be a Telstra Tech) asking me if my line was still down and said that it will be fixed tomorrow morning! I got a call around 10:30am the following day and it was the Telstra guy who repaired the cable asking me a few questions about the whole situation and then rang back about 20 minutes later with the answer to the problem and said it would be fixed within the hour! 🙂

So it turns out that on the day that the cable was repaired some other technicians were doing line tests and had picked my line to test as it was not a phone line with a dial tone (DSL only) and they didn’t reconnect the line back. So this was the reason why I lost my internet/phone about half hour after the street cable was repaired (over a week earlier) So my line was restored to its original setup and I was reconnected to my ISP’s DSLAM and hey presto… Internet access restored 🙂

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