Baofeng UV5-RX3 From Radioddity

For those familiar with the UV-5xx series radio’s they are targeted for Amateur Radio use (that may change in the future) for both the 2m VHF and 70cm UHF bands however this model also includes the 220MHz 1.5m band (predominately used in the USA)

Supplied items

  • UV-5RX3
  • 1800mAh Li-ion Battery
  • Dual Band Antenna
  • 220MHz Single Band Antenna
  • Desktop Charger Adapter
  • Original Earpiece
  • Wrist Strap
  • Belt Clip
  • User Manual

As there are two antennas supplied you need to ensure that you use the appropriate antenna for the intended frequency otherwise you will damage the radio. As the 220MHz band is not permitted here in Australia my testing for this radio was limited to the 2m & 70cm bands.

Specifications & Functions:

  • Frequency Range: 136-173.975MHz, 220-225MHz, 400-519.975MHz
  • FM Radio: 68-105MHz (RX)
  • Memory Channel: 128
  • Output Power: 5 Watts
  • Tone Scanning: CTCSS, DCS
  • Wide/Narrow Bandwidth Setting
  • Tone Burst
  • DTMF
  • VOX

This radio works well and the build quality is good, although for the Australian market having access to 220MHz is of no benefit as VHF DVBT is primary service and there is no 1.5m band available within Australia.

GA-5S From Radioddity

I was lucky enough to be selected to review the GA-5S dual band FM Radio. I’ve never used or owned any of these entry level Chinese radio’s so I was interested to see how they compare to some other known brands radios!

Unboxing this radio reveals that it comes with…

  • 1 x Radioddity GA-5S
  • 1 x 1800mAh Li-ion Battery
  • 1 x High Gain Antenna
  • 1 x Charging Cradle (with 100~240V Power Adapter)
  • 1 x Belt Clip
  • 1 x Earpiece
  • 1 x Wrist Strap
  • 1 x User Manual

After assembling the radio (antenna & battery) and powered the unit to find that it was programmed with frequencies that are not for general use in Australia, this is not a problem as I’ll be reprogramming this for the 2m and 70cm bands and limiting the receive to the amateur bands only (144-148MHz 430-450MHz) as the ACMA are not to keen on these radios because of how easy it is to use them on frequencies that are not for the general public. Now I’ve not had or used baofeng radio’s before so this is essentially the internals of (from what I have read online) a UV5-R. The supplied software for programming the radio is very basic, but it is compatible with Chirp so you can take advantage of the repeater database and import your local repeaters. At the time I first tried Chirp the support for the GA-5S wasn’t available, but on the second reprogramming I did the latest daily build had included both the GA-5S and the UV5-RX3.

For the price point this radio is targeted for its certainly fine, however I’d possibly not run it on full power for extended periods as the radio will get hot!

Ten Years with WordPress!

So a thing happened…

It all started from reading Linux magazine that had a feature article on WordPress and well I must liked it cause I’m still using it! Originally I was hosting my own website from home, but after quite a few years I then moved to hosting with Gandi and its lived there ever since… 😀

Zumspot Revival (I was wrong!)

Ok so I wrote recently that the ZUMspot Pi boards were no longer available from Bruce and I made the mistake of concluding that meant they were no longer available. Tuns out I was wrong! The ZUMspot Pi boards are available in the USA exclusively from HRO (Ham Radio Outlet)

There’s four listing’s when you do a search on their website for “ZUMspot”

So yup, I was wrong! I’m happy to wrong because it means that you can still get yourself a ZUMspot Pi board!